Google+ Followers

Wednesday, 25 September 2013

INDIAN DISH!!

PANEER MAKHANWALA




PANEER MAKHANWALA

Cottage cheese 300gms
Onions 100gms
Ginger 20gms
Garlic 10gms
Green chilli 4nos
Red chilli powder ½ tspn
Coriander powder 1tspn
Tomatoes ½ kg
Garam masala powder ½ tspn
Cashew-nuts 10nos
Dry fenugreek leaves ¼ tspn
Butter 20gm
Salt to taste
Oil 30ml

PREPARATION:

Peel and fine chop onions. Blanch tomatoes for 20 seconds in boiling water. Remove skin, half, scoop out pulp. Pass pulp through a strainer. Puree 80% tomatoes in a blender and fine chop the rest. Keep aside. Boil cashew nuts for 5 minutes. Keep aside 3 of them, make a paste using water in a blender. Peel onion and garlic. Fine chop. Fine chop green chillies. Cut cottage cheese into ½ inch cubes.

Heat oil; sauté chopped onions till golden brown. Add in ginger, garlic and half of chillies. Stir for a minute. Add red chilli powder, chopped tomatoes. Stir for about 3 minutes. Add in tomato puree and salt. Stir & cook until fat separates. Now add in cashew nut paste, 50ml water& cottage cheese. Simmer 5 minutes. Finish off by sprinkling fenugreek leaves, garam masala powder, butter and remaing green chillies. Dish out, garnish with bolied cashew nuts and serve with chappaties / naans.



Monday, 16 September 2013

INDIAN DISH!!



LINGDI KA SAAG


Lingdi 2 bunch
Peanut / soybean oil 20ml
Onions 75gms
Asafetida 1/8 tspn
Cumin 1tspn
Red chilli powder ½ tspn
Ginger 1inch
Garlic 2cloves
Coriander powder 1tspn

PREPARATION:


Wash the lingdi and roughly cut them (1/2 cm length). Peel onions, garlic and ginger. Chop them. Heat oil, sputter cumin seeds. Add asafetida dissolved in a tablespoon of water. Stir in onions, garlic and ginger. When onions become soft. Add in, lingdi, salt and stir for about 30seconds. Add the remaining ingredients. Cover and simmer for about 15minutes. Serve with rice or bread.



LINGDI IS A LOCAL STEM TENDRIL VEGETABLE WHICH EITHER ONE LOVES OR HATES!! IT HAS BEEN MY CHILDHOOD FAVOURITE.LINGDI IS AVAILABLE IN THE LOCAL MARKET FROM JUNE TO SEPTEMBER. ACCORDING TO VENDORS, THEY COLLECT IT FROMTHE BANKS OF SMALL RIVERS NEAR A PLACE CALLED 'CHIDDERWALA' NEAR HARIDWARA. THE VEGETABLE  IS A RICH SOURCE OF IRON AND ROUGHAGE. IT HAS A TYPICAL FLAVOUR OF ITS OWNAND NOT MUCH SPICES ARE REQUIRED OR ELSE IT WILL SPOIL THE NATURAL FLAVOUR OF THE VEGETABLE. THANKFULLY IT HAS NOT REACHED ANY OF THE LUXURY HOTELS IN THE COUNTRY, OTHERWISE THE NATURAL TASTE, FLAVOUR AND SIMPLICITY OF THE DISH WOULD HAVE GONE FOREVER IN THE NAME OF CREATIVITY!!

Friday, 13 September 2013

INDIAN DISH!!

BATHUA KA SAAG




BATHUA KA SAAG

Bathua 1bunch
Mustard oil 50ml
Cumin 1tspn
Onions 100gms
Garlic 10gms
Garam masala powder ½ tspn
Vegetable stock 100ml
Bay leaf 1leaf
Ginger 10gms
Asafoetida a pinch
Coriander powder 1tspn
Peppercorns 6 to 8nos
Green chillies 6nos
Channa dal 4tbspn
Salt to taste
Cinnamon powder a pinch

PREPARATION:

Remove bathua leaves from the stem. Discard the stems. Thoroughly wash under running water.  Peel & chop onions & garlic separately. Scrape and grate ginger. Chop chillies. Wash and soak the channa dal in water for about 2 hours. Coarsely crush peppercorns. Dissolve asafetida in 10 ml water.
Heat oil in kadahi. Splutter cumin. Add asafoetida. Stir for about 10 seconds. Now add in onions, ginger and garlic. Shallow till onions are soft and translucent. Add bay leaf, peppercorns and channa dal. Add vegetable stock & little salt. Cover and cook for about 10 minutes. Remove the lid; add in bathua leaves along with coriander powder and green chillies. Add little more salt. Stir occasionally and cook for about 15minutes or until the mixture becomes dry. Finally sprinkle cinnamon powder & garam masala powder. Dish out and serve with a hot Indian bread.


NOTE:  One has to be careful while putting in the salt, the leaves shrink, therefore it is advisable to put minimum of salt. The dish is rich in proteins, fibre and iron. So excellent for anaemia and helps in dealing with constipation and digestive disorders.

Wednesday, 4 September 2013

INDIAN DESSERT!!

BOONDI LADOO


BOONDI LADOO

Besan (mota) 250gms
Sugar 200ml
Water 100ml
Rose water 10drops
Melon seeds 20gms
Black cardamom seeds 2gms
Silver leaf 1nos
Desi ghee to fry

PREPARATION:

Prepare a two string sugar syrup. Flavor with rose water. Prepare separately a thick batter with besan and soda bicarbonate dissolved in water. Heat ghee in a kadhai. Drop batter through a jharr (frying spoon with small perforations). Deep fry for about 3-4 minutes. Remove and drop into sugar syrup. Lift with a jharr after 5 minutes and put in a parat. Add melon seeds; shape into balls about an inch in diameter while still warm.
Garnish with silver leaf.


NOTE: 
You will find many variations of this ladoo with regard to colour, nuts, size of balls, size of boondi. It is the most popular sweet of India being served on every happy accession especially during festivals, marriages, birthdays, religious ceremonies, promotions as they are considered very auspicious.

Tuesday, 3 September 2013

SUBZ - PULAO!!

SUBZ PULAO




Basmati rice 200gms
Peas 100gms
French beans 50gms
Carrots 100gms
Cauliflower 50gms
Cardamom 1nos
Cloves 4nos
Cinnamon 1 stick
Bay leaf 1 nos
Peppercorns 6nos
Mace ½ nos
Salt to taste
Desi ghee 30gms
Water 160ml-175ml

PREPARATION:

Shell peas. Peel & cut carrots into ½ cm dices. String beans & cut them into neat dices. Peel & slice onions. Cut cauliflower into neat flowerettes. Pick, wash & soak rice for 20 minutes. Drain water. Heat fat. Add onions, stir and shallow fry till golden. Remove the onions. In the same fat, add rest of the vegetables, stir and cook for about 5 minutes. Add salt. Remove. In the fat, crackle whole spices. Add in water & salt. Bring to a boil. Add in chilli powder and rice. Bring to a boil. When about ¾ water is absorbed, add in vegetables. Cover with a lid. Place on a hot tava and cook for another 10 minutes.

Garnish with fried onions. Serve hot with a homemade raita.


Friday, 2 August 2013

SNACKS!!

www.chilli2cherry.com


POTATO GRENADES

Sandwich bread 6slices
Boiled milk 400ml
Potatoes 500gms
Peas 60gms
Nutmeg 1/8 nos
Oil to fry
Onions 125gms
Ginger 15gms
Green chillies 6nos
Coriander leaves 20gms
Peppercorns 8nos
Salt to taste
Butter 15gms

PREPARATION:

Peel potatoes, wash them, cut each of them into 8 to 10pcs. Boil in salted water till done. Drain, pass through a sieve. Trim the sides of the bread. Keep aside. Fine chop onions, ginger, green chillies and coriander leaves. Shell peas. Boil in salted water. Drain, refresh. Coarsely crush them. Crush peppercorns. Now mix potatoes, peas, onions, ginger, green chillies, coriander leaves, salt, nutmeg grated and butter.dip the bread lightly in milk. Place filling in the centre of the soaked bread slice. Form into an oval shape, resembling a grenade. Deep fry in hot oil till golden brown all around. Drain & place over the absorbent paper. Dish out and serve as an evening snack with ketchup or a garlic flavoured tomato chilli sauce.

It is a popular evening snack with the office going people. The children also love them as a brunch in school.

Thursday, 27 June 2013

INDIAN DISH!!


WADA SAMBHAR

Urd dal (washed) 200gms
Green chillies 4nos
Salt to taste
Chopped ginger 10gms
Peppercorns ½ tspn
Oil to fry

PREPARATION:

Wash and soak the dal for about 12hour. Grind coarsely. Add in chopped chillies, ginger & salt. Mix together & shape into small flat rounds about .8 cm to 1cm. deep fry in oil till crisp golden. Drain.

Arrange over a banana leaf & serve with coconut chutney & sambhar.

Tuesday, 18 June 2013

INDIAN DISH!!

WWW.CHILLI2CHERRY.COM



GUJRATI DAL

Malka masoor dal 200gms
Green chillies 5pcs
Ginger 10gm
Turmeric 2gm
Jaggery 25gm
Salt to taste
Tamarind 20gm
Oil 20ml
Mustard seeds 1gm
Fenugreek 1gm
Hing 1gm

METHOD:

Boil the gram till well cooked. Mash well.
Add sliced green chillies, ginger, turmeric, salt, tamarind juice and jaggery.
Boil for half an hour over slow fire. Remove.

Heat oil in a frying pan. Add mustard seeds, fenugreek & asafoetida. As the seeds splutter, add a pinch of red chilli powder &pour over dal. Mix well.
Serve hot.

Monday, 27 May 2013

WONDERFUL NUTS!!



NUTS ARE GOOD FOOD!

PISTAS AND WALNUTS –
1.      Defend against diabetes – the fat & nutrients in nuts may improve glucose & insulin stability in people with Type 2 diabetes.
Studies show
·         Eating nuts has been linked to a reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes in women. Those who ate nuts at least five times a week cut their risk of Type 2 diabetes by nearly 30 percent. Women who regularly ate peanut butter lowered their risk by nearly 20 percent.

2.      Help heart by reducing LDL cholesterol, which eventually leads to antherosclerotic plaque formation and hardening of the arteries.
Studies show
·         Men who ate nuts at least twice a week had a 47 percent lower risk of sudden cardiac death and a 30 percent lower risk of dying from all types of coronary – artery disease than those who didn’t eat nuts.
·         Women who ate at least 140gms of nuts a week were 35 percent less likely to suffer heart attacks than women who ate less than 28gms a month.
·         Healthy adults who consumed nuts five or more times a week were 50percent less likely to die of a heart attack than those who hardly ever ate nuts.

CASHEWS, MACADAMIA NUTS, BRAZIL NUTS, ALMONDS, PECANS & WALNUTS –
Help keeping trim as nuts have fibre and other nutrients that interfere with the absorption of fat, and are satisfying, so people feel fuller longer.
 Studies show
·         People who frequently eat nuts are thinner than those who don’t.
·         Eating walnuts decreases hunger and causes people to eat less at meals.
·         Macadamia nuts and Brazil nuts have the highest fat and calorie content among nuts.

PISTAS AND ALMONDS
Helps in lowering the cholesterol as polyunsaturated fat in nuts lowers LDL, or bad, cholesterol levels, and their monounsaturated fat raises good HDL cholesterol levels.
Studies show
·         The more almonds people ate, the lower their levels of LDL cholesterol and the higher their levels of HDL were. Eating 37 grams of almonds a day lowered LDL cholesterol by 4.4 percent; eating 73grams a day reduced it by 9.4 percent.
·         Eating pistachios nuts as a snack can decrease your bad cholesterol levels.

WALNUTS, PECANS AND BRAZIL NUTS
Helps countering cancer by slowing the progression of some cancer cells, and help destroy free radicals that can cause cancer.
Studies show
·         A form of vitamin E present in walnuts and pecans appear to slow the growth of lung and prostate cancer cells. Gamma-tocopherol attacked the cancer cells while leaving healthy cells alone.
·         Walnuts also contain melatonin, a hormone that destroys free radicals. Free radicals are unstable compounds that are a byproduct of cellular metabolism in our bodies; if they aren’t neutralized, they can cause cardiovascular disease and cancer.

·         Brazil nuts contain selenium, an oxidant that helps neutralize free radicals.

Thursday, 23 May 2013

A " 'MUST READ' FOR DIABETES SUFFERERS" I CAME ACROSS!!



DIABETES & DIET

A sedentary lifestyle, lack of physical activity, obesity, stress and consumption of diets rich in fat, sugar and calories are what has led to this high incidence of diabetes especially among Indians. The damage that diabetes does to the body pales in comparison to the damage it can inflict on the mind.

DIETARY GUIDELINES

There are general dietary guidelines that diabetes sufferers can follow to help to keep their blood sugar levels under control:
ü  Avoid being overweight and if you need to lose weight, see the doctor or dietician to formulate a diet tailored to your needs.

ü  Eat regular meals; exactly how many and how often can be decided by what suits you personally.

ü  Eat more starchy, high-fibre foods with a low glycemic index, such as beans, peas and lentils. These foods cause only gradual rise in blood glucose levels because their starch is digested slowly. Trace elements, B vitamins and magnesium are also provided by whole grains.

ü  Cut down on foods with a high glycemic index: sugar, sweetened soft drinks, cakes, potatoes and potato products. Avoid snacking on confectionery and chocolate between meals. Their sugar is absorbed quickly and causes rapid increases in blood glucose levels.

ü  Eat at least five portions of fresh fruit and vegetables for their soluble fibre, phytochemicals, vitamins and minerals. Fruit makes an ideal snack or pudding. If you eat canned fruit, choose those in natural juice rather than syrup. Dried fruits, especially dates, are a concentrated form of sugar and so should only be eaten in small quantities.

ü  Cut down on saturated fats, which can increase risk of coronary heart disease in diabetes.

ü  Eat one or two portions of oily fish a week for omega-3 fatty acid to normalize blood pressure and blood fat levels.

ü  Limit salt and salty foods, which increase susceptibility to high blood pressure. Beware of hidden salt in canned, smoked and processed foods; in chips and other snacks.

ü  Keep alcohol consumption at moderate levels. Remember that low-sugar diet beers and lagers tend to have high alcohol content.

ü  Although artificial sweeteners may be useful, special diabetic products are usually unnecessary.

ü  Drink water, or sugar-free drinks.

Tuesday, 21 May 2013

MANGOES: COMMON INFORMATION GATHERED FROM VARIOUS SOURCES ABOUT THE FRUIT!


MANGOES

This delicious summer fruit has more to it than mere something good to eat. The tall trees mean a lot; its twigs are considered auspicious for pooja (hawan), leaves for pooja room décor, raw mangoes are used to make tongue-tickling chutneys and pickles. During summer vacations, kids spend all day knocking down its fruits, swings are tied from one of its branches. Last but not least the tree shades comfort the travelers or the passersby. Maharashtra, famous for Alphonsos, amba in Marathi means mango. It also has villages named after aam: Ambevalli, Ambevadi and Ambenalli.

HEALTHFUL - Ripe mangoes are a good source of potassium and Vitamin A (good for eyes). Vitamins B1, B2, and C are in abundance, in unripe mangoes. Raw ones have great amount of protein & iron. Mangoes have no fat and are low in carbohydrates. But overindulgence can cause colic and dysentery.  

*         

Magnifera indica about 4000 year old fruit is believed to have originated in the Himalayan foothills of eastern India. It went to eastern Asia in ancient times, Portuguese colonizers took it to Africa & Brazil in the 16th century & since then it’s been cultivated in nearly every tropical and sub –tropical region. Popular varieties grown overseas include Australia’s bright orange yellow Kensington, Thailand’s dark green Tongdum (“Black Gold”), the oval, slightly beaked sensation seen in Florida, USA, the rosy Rommy Atkins of South Africa & Mexico. India tops in annual production with 52% of the world’s mangoes, followed by Mexico & Pakistan.
In the country’s biggest mango malls, Alphonsos might be sold for Rs600 a dozen, while unassuming Badami (larger, fleshier lemon-yellow mango with its distinctive relish) can be had for a tenth of the price.
Many northerners prefer the green – skinned Langra or golden Dusheri. In western region, of course the Alphonso, but Goans prefer Mankurad. According to horticulture scientist from Ratnagiri, Alphonsos may be popular, but the fruit often have inedible spongy tissue and some host insect pests. As Neelam mangoes, a southern variety, don’t have these problems, the scientist painstakingly transferred its pollen grains on to Alphonso flowers using a thin brush. The resulting hybrid was large like the Neelam and blushed like the Alphonsos when ripe, with no pests and hardly any spongy tissue. It was named Ratna, after Ratnagiri (name of that place). But Ratna mangoes were too sweet but deprived of the Alphonso’s uniquely piquant tang. Like an artist mixing colours the horticulturist now had to achieve the right blend of genes to reduce the sugars and restore the tang. Only after he incestuously “back crossed “ flowers from the parent alphonso tree with Ratna pollen grains did he get mangoes with no problems that looked and tasted like the best Alphonsos. But the new mango was almost all flesh with just a wafer-thin stone inside. A seedless Alphonso! It was the kind of serendipity horticulturists only dream about. It was named Sindhu, after neighbouring Sindhudurg district (its research station). It took nearly 13 years of trial and error and of waiting for mango saplings to grow up, bloom and bear fruit. But it’s paying off. Sindhu saplings have already been sold tens of thousands. So it may upstage Alphonso some day!! Until then the old, seeded Alphonso will lead the list of the finest mangoes. It owes its Latin name probably to a colonial Portuguese official who was passionate about it. Indeed, the portuguese were the first t try vegetative propagation or grafting of the fruit. The English word mango itself derives from manga, borrowed by the Portuguese from the Tamil mankai.
A mango recipe:






Wednesday, 8 May 2013

INTERNATIONAL DISH!

chilli2cherry.com


FISH AMMENDINE (ALMONDS FISH)



Fish fillet 250gms
Salted butter 50gms
Lime juice 20ml
Almonds 50gms

MARINATION

Oil 30ml
Mustard paste 5gms
Salt to taste
Grounded black pepper 6nos
Dill leaves a sprig
Lime juice 15ml
White wine 20ml

GARNISH

Lemon star

PREPARATION:

Wash fish. Cut into neat supremes. Marinate in the prepared marinade for 10 minutes. Blanch almonds. Deskin. Cut into half lengthwise. Toast under salamander until nicely browned. Keep aside. Cook fish in the meuniere style. Arrange in a serving dish / plate. Heat butter until browned. Garnish with lemon star & remaining almonds.

Friday, 19 April 2013

INTERNATIONAL MAIN COURSE DISH!!



STUFFED CHICKEN WITH FONDANT POTATOES, GRILLED TOMATOES & GLAZED BABY CARROTS!!



Thursday, 18 April 2013

SECRETS OF ONION!!



SECRETS OF ONION

Onion is a vegetable that we use in cooking on a daily basis. It is a universal ingredient that is used in salads, soups, gravies, stew etc. but how many of us know the other aspects of onions.

GENERAL INFORMATION ON ONIONS-

Onion is a fair source of vitamin C, organic sulphides, phendic constitutes, amino acids & essential oils. The juice of an onion is one of pungency which is due to the presence of allyl propyl disulphide, a volatile oil. Onion is grown all over the world, mainly in the temperate zones. The edible parts consists of the thickened leaf bases arising from the stem plate at the base of the bulb, the upper part of the leaf is hollow & cylindrical. A tuft of shallow fibrous, root emerge from the stem plate. Onion powder is a spice which is ground dehydrated trimmed onion bulbs whereas onion salt is onion powder mixed with free salt. These days dehydrated instant minced onion is also available in the market.

ONION & NATUROPATHY-

Onions are one of the finest tonics we have
·         If eaten raw at supper time, onion ensures a good night sleep.
·         A well boiled or fried onion helps in controlling bad cough & cold.
·         Mixed with common salt, onion is a common remedy in colic & scurvy.
·         In malaria fever onion if eaten twice a day with 2-3 black pepper provides great relief.
·         In case of bleeding from nose an onion is cut in halves & placed on the neck.
·         Toothache is allayed by placing a small piece of onion of onion on bad tooth or gum.
·         Warts also sometimes disappear if rubbed with onion piece.
·         Roasted onions are applied to boils, bruises, wounds etc to relieve burning sensation & to bring boil to maturity.
·         In dysentery & high temperatures they are applied to the navel.
·         The juice of roasted onion is placed in the ear which is an old remedy for earache.
·         A fresh onion juice promotes perspiration, relieves constipation, bronchitis & induces sleep.
·         Onion juice is an excellent remedy for epilepsy.
·         Onion is applied locally to allay irritation of insect’s bites, scorpion stings & bee stings.
·         Applying its juice on bald patches on head is said to promote hair growth.
·         Cooked with vinegar, it becomes a useful medicine for jaundice.
·         Onion is used like smelling salt in faintness, convulsion, and headaches, epileptic & hysterical fits.
·         Mixed with mustard oil in equal proportions, its application is beneficial in rheumatic pains & inflammatory swellings.